Posts tagged: Vitalwave

Vitalwave™ – An Overview

Vitalwave™ is the application of photodisinfection to the birth canal. It is a therapy currently under development by OrGenX Biopharma Corporation and Ondine Biomedical Inc. for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV. More than 90% of HIV infections in children are caused by mother-to-child transmission. This is the equivalent of 1,600 children becoming infected with HIV every day, or one child every minute1, affecting 1 out of every 4 babies born. Vitalwave™ is intended to bypass the stigma associated with AIDS, and designed to be safe, instantly effective and inexpensive to allow for universal deployment in resource-poor counties.

It is estimated that 13-38% of all pregnant women in South Africa are HIV positive1. Current estimates indicate that 90% of HIV-positive women in resource-poor settings do not have access to antiretroviral (ARV) medication on a regular basis and often reject treatment due to fear of the stigma-related threats of violence and abandonment. In the absence of ARV treatment, a pregnant woman has a 14-42% chance of passing HIV on to their child during labour and delivery2. A higher HIV vaginal viral load in the mother is associated with an increased risk of transmission to their unborn child. Vitalwave™ is currently being designed to safely and immediately reduce the HIV vaginal viral load to low levels.

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Vitalwave Is Live-Blogging From The Global Business Coalition – Day 2

8:05am: Yesterday, the GBC special session meetings were hosted by Thompson Reuters in their building on Times Square. Today, the GBC Health Conference will be held at Cipriani Wall Street – an impressive venue in the heart of the financial district.

8:40am: John Tedstrom, CEO of the GBC announces that the Global Business Coalition on HIV, Malaria and TB will change its name to GBC Health and expand its scope to global health.

What does this mean and why would GBC expand its scope in the current economic climate when there is still so much to be done in HIV?  I think this is because HIV is not a disease that exists in isolation. Very few HIV+ people have HIV as their only health issue. GBC Health will now address the issues of HIV, malaria and TB in an appropriate  context. There are 33 million people living with HIV worldwide. There  are 90 million people in China living with diabetes. There are lots of big issues on the global health stage.  The lessons learned and progress made by GBC over the last ten yrs place GBC in a unique position to lead businesses in an effort to address issues in global health in a bigger and broader way. It is a challenging time for GBC, but based on their past successes, it will be exciting to see what impact they will have in the coming future. Read more »

Vitalwave Is Live-Blogging From The Global Business Coalition – Day 1

8:47am: We’re here live at the GBC in New York! Looking forward to an exciting few days.

8:53am: @ the opening session of the GBC: “Creating An HIV Free Generation In Kenya.” This is inspired by the idea that “If we can create hope, we can save lives.” This is a pilot program using private sector core comps from the likes of nike, MTV, and Warner bros. Targeting youth (age 10-24) to avoid HIV (making it cool to change behaviour and avoid HIV)

8:53am: John speaks at GBC about MTVs role in the pilot HIV free generation partnership.

9:50am: Starting the next GBC special session – “innovative financing for health”. This session will discuss trends, challenges, and future of developing pioneering platforms to mobilize resources.

10:01am: Seth Berkley CEO of international AIDS vaccine initiative says there are more drugs to treat HIV then all other viruses put together, but we have no HIV vaccine yet. Read more »

Vitalwave Will Live-Blog From The Global Business Coalition’s Annual Conference!

The 10th Anniversary of the Global Business Coalition’s Annual Conference will take place in New York City June 1stand 2nd.  With the theme of “Bold Leadership.  Big Impact,” the 2011 GBC Conference will focus on “Business Driving Change for a Healthier World.”

Vitalwave’s own Bryon Bhagwandin will live-blog from this event featuring special sessions, panel discussions, an awards dinner and fund-raising auction presented by a star-studded line-up of over 1,000 business executives, policy makers, celebrities and thought leaders.  Some of the presenters include Sir Richard Branson, George Soros, Ted Turner, Gordon Brown, Kenneth Cole and Sarah Jessica Parker.  In addition, Whoopi Goldberg will host the Gala Awards dinner where Sigourney Weaver and Kim Cattrall will present awards and Natalie Merchant will provide musical entertainment.

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Preventing Mother-to-Child HIV Transmission (PMTCT): A Common Fight

In 2009 it was estimated that there were 2.5 million children living with HIV/AIDS [1]. This heartbreaking number is 2.5 million more than it should be. Sadly, it is anyone’s guess how many of these infections could have been averted by the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV.

PMTCT
PMTCT is the acronym used to describe the efforts and protocols used in the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV. Although PMTCT may at first seem a bit complicated, there are some steps like educating mothers-to-be, testing them for HIV, informing them of breast milk substitutes, following safer delivery practices and giving them access to anti-retroviral drugs and treatments. These measures can substantially cut down rates of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV.

PMTCT has been recognized as one of the best ways to combat HIV/AIDS, especially in the fight for the lives of children. And with that recognition, the efforts to implement PMTCT have been stepped up globally. For example, in 2005 the percentage of HIV infected women who had access to treatment in developing countries was only 15%. This percentage grew to 23% in just one year, and by 2009 it was 53% [2]. Read more »

Remembering Elizabeth Taylor – HIV/AIDS Activist

Elizabeth Taylors - AIDS Activist, Relentless Crusader, Pioneer and Hero

Elizabeth Taylor — a great and courageous ally, friend and champion — has passed and we stop for a moment today to honor her courage and activism on behalf of so many of us.

When she first began speaking out about HIV/AIDS in the early 1980s, there was still a great deal of mystery, fear and stigma surrounding the disease. She was the first really big celebrity to use her fame to advocate for better public health policy, and to raise funds for HIV/AIDS treatment, services and research.

While she started local, appearing at the first major AIDS benefit for AIDS Project Los Angeles (APLA), in 1985 she joined forces with Dr. Mathilde Krim and went on to become the founding international chairperson of the American Foundation for AIDS Research (amFAR).

It was a time when thousands of people became devastatingly ill and died rapid and horrible deaths, and yet the silence from our government was deafening. In those dark times, Elizabeth Taylor used the light of her celebrity to draw mainstream media attention to the government’s failure to respond to the AIDS crisis. She boldly stood with us to urge public support for better treatment of people living with HIV/AIDS. In those days, before e-mail, texting, Facebook and Twitter, her voice had a powerful ripple effect that helped make the world more aware of this growing health crisis. Read more »

Winning The Fight Against Mother-to-Child HIV Transmission

Countries all over Sub-Saharan Africa have built a strong foundation in the fight against HIV

Not so long ago, HIV/AIDS was presumed to be a disease that could never be stopped. It hit so hard and so fast that the first crucial moments, when much could have been done, were not taken advantage of. By the time it was recognized as an pandemic too many people had already been infected. And then, the next generation started feeling the effects too, when children became infected via mother-to-child-transmission (MTCT). The hardest hit countries were almost all here in Sub-Saharan Africa, where it was thought that there was absolutely no hope of winning the fight against HIV/AIDS. Read more »

Today is National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

Let's empower communities and organizations to take action in the fight against HIV/AIDS

Far too many people think that HIV/AIDS is only a crisis in developing countries. Unfortunately, this is untrue. In March 2009, the state of Washington D.C reported an HIV prevalence of at least 3% among residents over 12 years old, a rate similar to those found in some parts of Sub-Saharan Africa.1 Today’s National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day in the US is a nationwide observance to raise awareness of the impact of HIV/AIDS on women and girls and encourage them to get tested. This is especially important in low-income communities where access to healthcare based education and prevention measures are typically inadequate. It is also a day therefore aimed at empowering communities and organizations to take action in the fight against HIV/AIDS. Read more »

Mother-to-child Transmission of HIV: The Way Forward

I live in Ethiopia. Ever since HIV/AIDS came out of nowhere and took center stage in the early 80’s, it  has managed to spread to every nook and cranny of the world and claim the lives of millions of mothers and children around us. In a country where we used to bury someone close almost every week, we have seen a big change: countries with the highest infection and mortality rates, like Ethiopia, have been able to slow down the HIV trend. Yet, sadly, there are still other countries in Sub-Saharan Africa where more needs to be done: in South Africa, for example, the infection rate of HIV among pregnant women has been reported to be as high as 29%, this has not changed much in many years1. Read more »

Mother-To-Child Transmission: The Preventable Facet of HIV


Less than half of pregnant women in Sub-Saharan Africa have access to antiretroviral treatment

Mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV occurs when an HIV-positive mother infects her child during pregnancy, labor and delivery, or through breastfeeding. In 2008, a Global Summary of the AIDS Epidemic conducted by UNAIDS showed that 2.1 million children under 15 years of age were living with HIV. In this report, one of the nine goals set out for the 2009-2011 period Read more »

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